"We Discovered Ellen White Failed the Biblical Tests of a Prophet"

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The Great Thief

By Dirk Anderson, last updated June 2009

Over a staggering 20-year period, Ellen G. White turned repeatedly for inspiration to a book written by John Harris entitled The Great Teacher. Reverend Harris' thoughts and words show up throughout her inspired writings from the late 1880s through the early 1900s...

  • Copied his words into her books, such as Steps to Christ and Desire of Ages
  • Copied his words into her testimonies
  • Copied his words into her articles written for church magazines
  • Copied his words into sermons she delivered
  • Copied his words into personal letters she penned
...and all without ever giving a single acknowledgement or credit to the non-SDA man who was her secret source of inspiration for so many years!

The broad scope of the plagiarism is sure to mark this as one of the greatest literary thefts in religious history.

The following evidence demonstrates that Ellen White relied upon The Great Teacher--a book she had in her "personal library."1--as a source of inspiration. She began copying from the preface of his book, continued copying from every chapter, and nearly every page, from beginning to end. The evidence gathered below is only a preliminary study. There is no doubt that a more in-depth study would reveal even more plagiarism.

John Harris
The Great Teacher: Characteristics of Our Lord's Ministry
Published by J.S. & C. Adams, 1837
Ellen G. White
Various books, articles, personal letters
The stamp of the Divinity upon a child of the dust! What noble intellectual and moral powers! (p. 9) We see by faith the stamp of divinity upon the human children of God. We see those who have noble intellectual and moral powers.
(1888 Materials, page 1514, Chapter Title: To O. A. Olsen)
There the plan of redemption was more fully unfolded, than ever before, to the admiring gaze of angels. (p. 15) The theme of redemption is one that the angels desire to look into...
(Steps to Christ, p. 88)
Here is ... — infinite wisdom — infinite love — infinite justice — infinite mercy ! Depths, heights, length, breadth — all passing knowledge! Innumerable pens have been employed upon the life, character, preaching and mediatorial work of Christ. (p. 16) Here are infinite wisdom, infinite love, infinite justice, infinite mercy. Here are depths and heights, lengths and breadths, for our consideration. Numberless pens have been employed in presenting to the world the life, the character, and the mediatorial work of Christ...
(The Review and Herald, April 4, 1899, para. 10)
The gospels, in which he is exhibited, as the divine object of our faith and love, and adoration ; and which contain the record of his miracles, doctrines, sufferings and final triumph, were given by inspiration of God, and 'the treasure of wisdom and knowledge' which they contain, are literally inexhaustible. After all the 'living water' that has been drawn from these 'wells of salvation,' there is no diminution of the supply. ... Nor can it be doubted, that the mysteries of redemption, including the divine and mediatorial character, the incarnation and atoning sacrifice of the Son of God, will employ the minds, the hearts, and the tongues of the Redeemed, through everlasting ages... (pp. 16-17) Then we will exhibit Christ as the divine object of our faith and our love. ... We will present before the people His miracles, His self-denial, His self-sacrifice, His sufferings, and His crucifixion, His resurrection and triumphant ascension. ... Here are the treasures of wisdom and knowledge, a fountain inexhaustible. ... The living water may be drawn from the fountain and yet there is no diminution of the supply. .... He should ponder the truth, and meditate upon the mysteries of redemption especially the mediatorial work of Christ for this time. If Christ is all and in all to every one of us, why are not His incarnation and His atoning sacrifice dwelt upon more in the churches? Why are not hearts and tongues employed in the Redeemer's praise? This will be the employment of the powers of the redeemed through the ceaseless ages of eternity.
(Manuscript Releases Vol. 8, pp. 274-275; 1888 Materials, pp. 432-433)
Bringing all the rays of prophetic light together, he wreathed them into a crown of glory for his own head. (p. 20) The divine Teacher desired to bring all the rays of prophetic light to bear upon the lesson that he was the truth-bearer to the world.

(The Review and Herald, October 3, 1899)
...while digging for more coins and concealed jewels, should unexpectedly happen on a vein of precious ore. ...But let the shaft which is already begun, be sunk deep enough, and the labors of the mine be properly conducted and the discovery of many a rich and precious lode... (p. 26) He was continually educating his disciples to work in the mine of truth, to sink the shaft deep, and gave them the assurance that their labors would be richly rewarded; for they would discover many precious veins of valuable ore.
(The Review and Herald, April 3, 1894)
...this, which would bring all blessings in its train ; which is offered in an abundance corresponding to its infinite plenitude, an abundance, of which the capacity of the recipient is to be the only limit... (p. 28) This promised blessing, claimed by faith, brings all other blessings in its train. It is given according to the riches of the grace of Christ, and He is ready to supply every soul according to the capacity to receive.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 672)
The church itself requires conversion. (p. 28) The church needs to be converted...
(Special Testimony to Battle Creek Church (1896), p. 4)
Sin having expelled from his heart the love of God, the love of the world has rushed into the vacuum. (p. 35) When the love of God is expelled, the love of the world quickly flows in to supply the vacuum.
(The Review and Herald, March 31, 1896)
Now the Saviour addressed himself to the task of correcting this evil. Entering the mart of the busy world, where nothing is heard but the monotonous hum of the traders in vanity, he lifts up his voice like the trump of God, and seeks to break the spell which infatuates them, while he exclaims, 'What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul ? or what shall he give in exchange for his soul?' (p. 36-37) Jesus came to change this order of things, to correct this wide-spread evil. He lifts up his voice as the voice of God in warnings, reproofs, and entreaties, seeking to break the spell which infatuates, enslaves, and ensnares men. He presents before them the future eternal world, and addressing them in decided language, says, "For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?"
(The Review and Herald, February 2, 1897)
He aims to impregnate every moment of life with endless results. (p. 37) It was to impregnate every moment of the present life with future, eternal realities.
(The Review and Herald, February 1, 1898)
...the fatal and universal propensity of men to subordinate the claims of the future to the affairs of the present. (p. 39) It is the almost universal practise of men to subordinate the eternal to the temporal; the claims of the future, the unseen, to the common affairs of the present.
(The Review and Herald, January 11, 1898)
...in the midst of their household cares, he calls them to his side, and turns on them a look of pity as he reminds them, that while they are careful and cumbered about many things, 'one thing is needful.' (p. 39) The Lord looks with pity on those who allow themselves to be burdened with household cares and business perplexities. They are cumbered with much serving, and neglect the one thing essential.
(The Review and Herald, March 5, 1908)
As the worshippers of mammon make religion subservient to the world, so he requires the worshippers of God to subordinate the world to religion. ...some of them things that perish in the using, and others of them things that form the gold and currency of heaven, things on which God has stamped his image and superscription... (pp. 40-41) As the lovers of the world make religion subservient to the world, God requires His worshipers to subordinate the world to religion. The things of the world, that perish with the using, are not to be made the first consideration; these are not the golden currency of heaven. God has not stamped upon them His image and superscription.
(MS 16, 1890; S.D.A. Bible Commentary Vol. 7 (1957), page 949).
...and aware that we are in danger of lavishing our affections—-those precious things which if given to God would bring us heaven in return—-of wasting them on less than nothing and vanity, and entreats us that we cheat not our souls of eternal happiness... (p. 41) Jesus entreats that those for whom he died, may not lose their eternal reward by lavishing their affections on the things of this perishing earth, and so cheat themselves out of unending happiness.
(The Review and Herald, November 24, 1891)
Yes, by throwing open to us the gates of a heavenly commerce... (p. 42) His sacrifice has thrown open wide to you the gates of heavenly commerce.
(The Review and Herald, March 5, 1908)
...he would give scope to our loftiest aims, security to our choicest treasures...(p. 42) He would give encouragement to our loftiest aims, security to our choicest treasure.
(Christ's Object Lessons (1900), page 374)
...his one talent, consecrated to God, has augmented into a treasure, exceeding his powers of computation. (p. 43) Though we have but one talent, if it be faithfully consecrated to God...our talent will increase in value, and be noted upon the heavenly record as exceeding our powers of computation.
(The Signs of the Times, September 12, 1895)
New habits are to be formed, powerful propensities are to be held at bay, old and indulged inclinations are to be denied, and enemies which we fondly thought we had laid dead at our feet, suddenly starting into hostility again... (p. 44) Self then dies; new habits are to be formed; strong inclinations and propensities are overcome. Enemies within and without are ready to spring into life and overcome you.
(The Ellen G. White 1888 Materials (1987), page 794; letter to Uriah Smith)
WHEN, in the fulness of time, the eternal Son came forth from the bosom of the Father... (p.49) When in the fulness of time the Son of the infinite God came forth from the bosom of the Father...
(The Signs of the Times, May 17, 1905, paragraph 5)
'When the fulness of time was come, God sent forth his Son.'' 'Hear, O heavens ; and be astonished, O earth !' the appointed Instructor appears, and proves to be no less a being than the Son of God himself. (pp. 52-53) "When the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son." ... Hear, O heavens, and be astonished, O earth; for the appointed instructor of man was no less a personage than the Son of God!
(The Signs of the Times, April 15, 1897)
...their surprise at his stores of sacred science was augmented by their knowledge of the fact, that he had 'never learned,' never approached the schools of human instruction. He had access to a tree of knowledge they knew not of. (pp. 53-54) They were surprised at the knowledge and wisdom He showed in answering the rabbis. They knew that He had not received instruction... But they did not discern that He had access to the tree of life, a source of knowledge of which they were ignorant.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 86)
...his message was nothing less than the stern necessity of immediate repentance, and the approaching erection of a heavenly kingdom : 'Repent ye, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.' The voice came pealing from the Judean desert...all flocked and thronged to the scene of this remarkable prodigy. (p. 55) Amid discord and strife, a voice was heard from the wilderness, a voice startling and stern, yet full of hope: "Repent ye; for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." ... Multitudes flocked to the wilderness.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 104)
He held the key of all the treasures of wisdom... (p. 59) He held the keys to all the treasures of wisdom...
(The Review and Herald, November 17, 1891)
Jonah was one of the most exalted names of which the Israelites could boast. His voice, like a blast from the trump of God, had pealed through the streets of Nineveh, and had made all its palaces tremble : his preaching had humbled the mightiest nation of the east; had instrumentally preserved an empire from destruction ; had caused their religion and their laws to be revered by the surrounding lands, and had greatly exalted the God of Israel before the heathen. Yet aware that all these impressions of Jonah's greatness were vividly present to their minds, 'behold,' said he, 'a greater than Jonah is here!'

Solomon with them was a name for glory. As the the founder of their magnificent temple, as the instrument of raising their nation to the loftiest point of prosperity, as the most highly endowed and wisest of men, the depository and personification of wisdom, they hallowed his name with a reverence which fell little short of idolatry: so that to assert superiority to him was, in their eyes, to claim to be considered as more than a man; as passing beyond the limits of humanity, and invading the precincts of Deity. Yet aware that such was their high and jealous regard for his fame, and while standing amidst the splendid memorials of his greatness, 'Behold,' said he, 'a greater than Solomon is here!' (p. 63)

Jonah was one of these men, held in high estimation by the Jewish nation. His voice had been heard throughout Nineveh, and had made kings and the highest nobility tremble. His words of warning from God had humbled the mightiest in that wicked city, and had made them understand that there was a living God who was about to punish them for their iniquity. Because the Ninevites heard the message of mercy to some purpose, because they humbled their hearts and repented at the preaching of Jonah, the God of heaven was revered before the heathen world. As Christ recalled to the minds of his hearers, Jonah's message and his instrumentality in saving that people, he said: "...behold, a greater than Jonas is here."

Christ knew that the Israelites regarded Solomon as the greatest king that ever wielded a scepter over an earthly kingdom. By special appointment of God, he had built their first magnificent temple, which was a marvel of beauty, richness, and glory, and gave influence and dignity to Israel as a nation. He was endowed with wisdom, and his name had been glorified by them. To be superior to him was, in their eyes, to be more than human, to possess the prerogatives of Deity. Yet Christ declared: "...behold, a greater than Solomon is here."
(The Youth's Instructor, September 23, 1897)

His name was to be their watchword, their badge of distinction, the principle of their piety, the bond of their union, the end of their actions, the authority for their conduct, and the source of their success. Nothing was to be recognized or received in his kingdom, which did not bear the superscription of his name... (p. 66) Christ's name is their watchword, their badge of distinction, their bond of union, the authority for their course of action, and the source of their success. Nothing that does not bear His superscription is to be recognized in His kingdom.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 826)
Witness the cleansing of the temple. Intent on gain, the Jews had converted the holy place into a scene of sacrilegious traffic ; they had turned the ancient and solemn passover itself to profit; they bartered deep in the blood of human souls ; they worshipped mammon in his Father's house. But 'suddenly coming to his temple,' he flamed around its hallowed walls... (p. 70) Consider the cleansing of the temple at the beginning of Christ's ministry. He found the Jews intent on gain. They had made the court of the temple a scene of sacrilegious traffic, and had turned the ancient and sacred institution of the passover into a means of vile profit. They bartered deeply, turning the service instituted by Christ himself into the worship of mammon. But Christ came suddenly into the temple courts, divinity flashed through humanity...
(The Ellen G. White 1888 Materials (1987), page 1490, letter to J.H. Kellogg)
...can so identify it with our thoughts and aims, so blend it with the stream and current of our consciousness, that in yielding obedience to his word, we are only obeying the actings and impulses of our own minds. (pp. 75-76) And if we consent, He will so identify Himself with our thoughts and aims, so blend our hearts and minds into conformity to His will, that when obeying Him we shall be but carrying out our own impulses.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 668)
So perfect was his example, that had it been possible for the least inconsistency to have existed between his instructions and his life... (p. 79) So perfect was the example and life of Christ, that not the least jot of inconsistency existed between His instructions and His life.
(Manuscript Releases Volume 12 [Nos. 921-999] (1990), page 334)
...the holy law rejoiced the while in its living representative. He could look round on a nation of witnesses, and say, ' Which of you convicteth me of sin?' (p. 79) Christ was a living representative of the law. No violation of its holy precepts was found in His life. Looking upon a nation of witnesses who were seeking occasion to condemn Him, He could say unchallenged, "Which of you convicteth Me of sin?"
(The Signs of the Times, March 29, 1910, paragraph 4)
...the holy law rejoiced the while in its living representative. He could look round on a nation of witnesses, and say, 'Which of you convicteth me of sin?' with the certainty that the challenge could not be accepted. (p. 79) Christ was a living representative of the law. No violation of its holy precepts was found in His life. Looking upon a nation of witnesses who were seeking occasion to condemn Him, He could say unchallenged, "Which of you convicteth Me of sin?"
(Desire of Ages (1898), page 287)
Truth never languished on his lips, never suffered in his hands, from want of sympathy in its advocate. 'To this end was I born,' said he, 'and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth.' And as often as it issued from his tongue, it came with the freshness of a new revelation; was announced with an earnestness commensurate with its intrinsic importance, and with the momentous results depending on its success... (p. 80) Truth never languished on His lips, never suffered in His hands for want of perfect obedience to its requirements. "To this end was I born," Christ declared, "and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth." And the mighty principles of truth fell from His lips with the freshness of a new revelation. The truth was spoken by Him with an earnestness proportionate to its infinite importance and to the momentous results depending on its success.
(Manuscript Releases Volume 21 [Nos. 1501-1598] (1993), page 38)
But he...spoke on every subject with the unfaltering assurance of certain knowledge. To him, truth, all truth was, in a sense, ever present and self-evident. Properly speaking, he uttered no mere sentiments, notions, or opinions, but only truths. He did not speak on probability and credit: his assertions were sustained on ultimate principles and personal knowledge. (p. 80) Every truth essential for the people to know He proclaimed with the unfaltering assurance of certain knowledge. He uttered nothing fanciful or sentimental. He presented no sophistries, no human opinions. No idle tales, no false theories clothed in beautiful language, came from His lips. The statements that He made were truths established by personal knowledge.
(Testimonies for the Church Volume 8 (1904), page 201)
...he was unfolding truth of the highest order—the words of eternal life. (p. 81) He presented to the world the plan of salvation, and unfolded truth of the highest order, even the words of eternal life.
(The Review and Herald, January 7, 1890)
It was peculiar to him, of all born of women, to be entirely free from the taint of selfishness. 'He pleased not himself.' The whole of his course was a history of pure disinterested benevolence. (p. 82) Christ was free from every taint of selfishness. He pleased not himself. His whole life was one of disinterested benevolence.
(The Review and Herald, March 28, 1893, paragraph 8)
'He pleased not Himself.' The whole of his course was a history of pure disinterested benevolence. He had assumed our nature... (p. 82) Christ pleased not Himself. The whole of His life was the development of a pure, disinterested benevolence. He assumed human nature...
(The Bible Echo, July 20, 1896)
...he rejoiced in the secret consciousness that he intended to do abundantly more than he had said... (p. 82) Christ rejoiced in the secret consciousness of what he purposed to do for man. He desires to do far more abundantly than we are able to ask or think.
(The Youth's Instructor, March 12, 1896)
When uttering his largest professions of sympathy and love, he rejoiced in the secret consciousness that he intended to do abundantly more than he had said; that, besides the stream of goodness and truth which issued daily from his lips, he held within his heart a fountain of compassion... (p. 82) While uttering his tenderest words of sympathy he rejoiced in the consciousness that he intended to do "exceedingly abundantly," above what they were able to ask or think. Daily he exhibited before them, in works of blessing to man, how great was his tenderness and love to the fallen race. His heart was a fountain of inexhaustible compassion...
(Sabbath-School Worker, April 1, 1889)
He had assumed our nature for no other purpose than to display the glory of God in the happiness of man; and for this end he breathed out his life. When uttering his largest professions of sympathy and love, he rejoiced in the secret consciousness that he intended to do abundantly more than he had said ; that, besides the stream of goodness and truth which issued daily from his lips, he held within his heart a fountain of compassion, clear as crystal, as yet untouched ; but which, at the appointed hour, would issue forth, far exceeding expectation, and blessing the world. (p. 82) He assumed human nature for no other purpose than to display to men the mercy, the love, and the goodness of God in providing for the salvation and happiness of His creatures. It was for this end that He died. While uttering His tenderest words of sympathy, He rejoiced in the consciousness that He intended to do "exceedingly abundantly," above what they were able to ask or think. Daily He exhibited before them, in works of blessing to man, how great was His tenderness and love to the fallen race. His heart was a fountain of inexhaustible compassion, from which the longing heart could be supplied with the water of life.
(Testimonies on Sabbath-School Work (1900), pp. 39-40)
...his truth, armed with the Omnipotence of the Holy Spirit, having completed the conquest of error... (p. 83) He knew that truth, armed with the omnipotence of the Holy Spirit, would conquer in the contest with evil.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 679)
Their established teachers, having long since completed the conquest of common sense, labored to preserve the fruits of their victory, by the endless repetition of fables and childish traditions. The loftiest models of public instruction with which they were acquainted, consisted in the heartless recitement of frivolous opinions and trivial ceremonies... (p. 83) The scribes had labored to establish their theories, and they had to labor to sustain them, and to keep their influence over the minds of the people by endless repetition of fables and childish traditions. The loftiest models of public instruction consisted largely in going through heartless rounds of unmeaning ceremonies and in the repetition of frivolous opinions.
(Sabbath-School Worker, April 1, 1889)
If we would learn of Christ, the soul must be vacated of all its proud prepossessions, that there may be room to prepare him a seat in the will. (pp. 85-86) If we would learn of Christ we must be emptied of every proud possession, that He may imprint His image upon the soul.
(Australasian Union Conference Record, July 12, 1899)
...'the arrows of the Lord,' though barbed and winged by an angel's hand, would fail to 'stick fast in it.' So potent is the spell, that it enables us to listen, not only to truths the most pungent, but even to the description which pourtrays the very delusion itself, without any self-application or effect. With such certainty does it turn aside and ward off every salutary impression... (p. 86) The barbed arrows of the Lord, sent by an angel's hand, come to such ones; but they are not wounded. So far have they departed from correct principles that they are blind. They listen to convincing truths, spoken with great earnestness, but still they do not reform; for they have turned aside and warded off every salutary impression.
(Manuscript Releases Volume One [Nos. 19-96] (1981), page 272)
But where is this preparation to be obtained? where, but at the throne of the heavenly grace. It is only at the altar, and from the hand of God, we can receive that celestial torch, which reveals at once our own incompetence, and the dignity and glory of Christ. That is the appointed place of meeting between God and the soul, where he puts us under the guidance of that holy spirit, who leads us into all truth: who takes the things of Christ as they fall from his lips, and conveys them as living powers into the obedient heart : who prepares and delivers us into the mould of the gospel, that we may take the perfect impress of its author. (p. 87) Our preparation to meet opponents or to minister to the people must be obtained of God at the throne of heavenly grace. Here, in receiving the grace of God, our own incompetence is seen and acknowledged. The dignity and glory of Christ is our strength. The Holy Spirit's guidance leads us into all truth. The Holy Spirit takes the things of God and shows them unto us, conveying them as a living power into the obedient heart. We then have the faith that works by love and purifies the soul, which takes the perfect impress of its Author.
(Evangelism, pp. 166-167; Letter 21a, 1895; The Review and Herald, December 22, 1904, paragraph 11)
It is only at the altar, and from the hand of God, we can receive that celestial torch, which reveals at once our own incompetence, and the dignity and glory of Christ. (p. 87) Only at the altar of sacrifice, and from the hand of God, can the selfish, grasping man receive the celestial torch which reveals his own incompetence and leads him to submit to Christ's yoke, to learn His meekness and lowliness.
(In Heavenly Places (1967), page 236)
...he puts us under the guidance of that holy spirit, who leads us into all truth: who takes the things of Christ as they fall from his lips, and conveys them as living powers into the obedient heart: who prepares and delivers us into the mould of the gospel, that we may take the perfect impress of its author. (p. 87) The Lord puts us under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, if we will walk humbly, trustingly, confidingly in Him. He leads us into all truth. The Holy Spirit takes the things of God as they fell from the lips of Christ and conveys them with living power to the obedient heart. He the Alpha and the Omega delivers us into the mold of the gospel that we may take the perfect image of its Author.
(Manuscript Releases - Volume Nine [Nos. 664-770] (1990), page 367)
He could have uttered a single sentence, which, by furnishing a key to many a mystery, and affording a glimpse of arcana before unknown, would have collected and concentrated around it the busy thoughts of each successive generation to the close of time. Opening one of the numerous doors at which human curiosity has been knocking impatiently for ages.... He disdained not the repetition of old and familiar truths, provided his introduction of them would subserve his grand design ; for though he proposed to erect a second temple of truth, the glory of which should eclipse the splendor of the first, he deigned to appropriate whatever of the ancient materials remained available. Truths, which the lapse of time had seen displaced and disconnected from their true position, as stars are said to have wandered from their primal signs, he recalled and established anew; and principles, which had faded, disappeared, and been lost, as stars are said to have become extinct, he re-kindled and re-sphered, and commanded them to stand fast forever. (p. 89) He could have opened mysteries which patriarchs and prophets desired to look into, which human curiosity had been impatiently desirous of understanding. But when men could not discern the most simple, plainly-stated truths, how could they understand mysteries which were hid from mortal eyes? Jesus did not disdain to repeat old, familiar truths; for he was the author of these truths. He was the glory of the temple. Truths which had been lost sight of, which had been misplaced, misinterpreted, and disconnected from their true position, he separated from the companionship of error; and showing them as precious jewels in their own bright luster, he reset them in their proper framework, and commanded them to stand fast forever.
(The Review and Herald, November 28, 1893)
The power of recasting important truths from their old and worn-out forms, and of giving them to the world again with all their original freshness and force... (p. 90) Christ had the power of recasting important truths, releasing them from the forms and customs in which they had been incased, which robbed them of life and vital power, and giving them back to the world in all their original freshness and force...
(The Ellen G. White 1888 Materials (1987), p. 260; Manuscript Releases Vol. 8 (1990), p. 132)
He sought access to their minds, by the beaten pathway of their most familiar associations... (p. 91) Again Jesus found access to the minds of His hearers by the pathway of their familiar associations.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 476)
He sought access to their minds, by the beaten pathway of their most familiar associations; he insinuated and intertwined his divine instruction with the network of their most hallowed recollections and sympathies...he drew his images and illustrations from the great treasury of our household affections, and from the most familiar features of nature. But the lily of the field, as plucked by his hand, has the freshness of the morning... (pp. 91-92) In his teaching Christ reached the minds of men by the pathway of their familiar associations. He linked his lesson with their most hallowed recollections and their tenderest sympathies. His illustrations were drawn from the great book of nature and from the treasury of household ties and affections. The simple lily of the field in its freshness and beauty was presented to the people by the great Master artist.
(The Youth's Instructor, March 19, 1903)
In order that he might obtain admission through the common avenue of our sympathies, and build himself a home in our hearts, he drew his images and illustrations from the great treasury of our household affections, and from the most familiar features of nature. But the lily of the field, as plucked by his hand... (p. 92) In his parables, in order that he might awaken interest and sympathy, he drew his illustrations from the things of nature. Plucking a lily in its glowing beauty...
(The Review and Herald, September 19, 1899, paragraph 11)
...it shows him in his high and holy place, not in a state of silence and solitude, but surrounded by ten thousands times ten thousand and thousands of thousands of holy, happy beings, and every one of them waiting to do his bidding...in active communication with every part of his vast dominions, through a numberless variety of channels...actually stooping from his throne and bending towards it... (p. 99) The Bible shows us God in His high and holy place, not in a state of inactivity, not in silence and solitude, but surrounded by ten thousand times ten thousand and thousands of thousands of holy intelligences, all waiting to do His will. Through channels which we cannot discern He is in active communication with every part of His dominion. ... God is bending from His throne to hear the cry of the oppressed.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 356)
Drawing aside the veil which concealed his glory from our eyes, it shows him in his high and holy place, not in a state of silence and solitude, but surrounded by ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands of holy, happy beings, and every one of them waiting to do his bidding; not in a state of inactivity and moral indifference, but in active communication with every part of his vast dominions, through a numberless variety of channels ; not in a state of apathy, regardless of the world, and all its multiplied concerns, but as actually stooping from his throne and bending towards it, listening to every sound it utters, observing the movement of every being it contains, and approving or condemning every action ... (p. 99) The Lord is in active communication with every part of His vast dominions. He is represented as bending toward the earth and its inhabitants. He is listening to every word that is uttered. He hears every groan; He listens to every prayer; He observes the movements of every one; He approves or condemns every action. The hand of Christ draws aside the vail which conceals from our eyes the glory of heaven; and we behold Him in His high and holy place, not in a state of silence and indifference to His subjects in a fallen world, but surrounded by all the heavenly host,--ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands, all waiting to go at His bidding on errands of mercy and love.
(The Signs of the Times, November 17, 1898, paragraph 2)
...the amount of divine attention bestowed on any given object, is proportioned to the rank which that object occupies in the scale of creation. (p. 100) The measure of divine attention bestowed on any object is proportionate to its rank in the scale of being.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 313)
But who shall anticipate the gifts of infinite love? ... Though sin has for ages distrurbed the equable flow of the divine benevolence to man, that benevolence had never, for a moment, ceased to accumulate, or lost its earthward direction. (p. 101) Who can measure or anticipate the gift of God? For ages sin had interrupted the flow of divine benevolence to man; but God's mercy and love for the fallen race have not ceased to accumulate, nor lost their earthward direction.
(The Signs of the Times, November 17, 1898)
And now, when the fulness of time was come, the windows of heaven, the heart of Deity itself, was opened, and poured forth on the world a healing flood of heavenly grace. ...but he so loved us, that he resolved on a gift, defying all computation... (p. 101) When the fulness of time came, the windows of heaven were opened, and upon the world was poured a flood of heavenly grace. God made to our world the wonderful gift of his only begotten Son. ... He made a sacrifice that defies all computation.
(The Review and Herald, January 3, 1907)
...he laid claim to the whole of our affections, by pouring out the whole treasury of heaven, by giving us his all at once. (p. 102) God claims the whole of the affections of man, the whole heart, the whole soul, the whole mind, the whole strength. He lays claim to all that there is of man, because he has poured out the whole treasure of heaven by giving us his all at once...
(The Ellen G. White 1888 Materials (1987), page 712)

By pouring the whole treasury of heaven into this world, by giving us in Christ all heaven, God has purchased the will, the affections, the mind, the soul, of every human being.
(Christ's Object Lessons (1900), page 326)

...when God might have sent his son to condemn the world, he was sent--amazing grace!--to save it. Herein is love! (p. 103) Amazing grace! Christ came not to condemn the world, but to save the world. "Herein is love..."
(The Review and Herald, July 17, 1900)
His whole life was only a preface to his death. (p. 105) His whole life was a preface to his death on the cross.
(Special Testimonies On Education (1897), page 231)
...having cast up and pondered the mighty sum of guilt to be cancelled...he pressed the entire responsibility to his heart, and addressed himself to the task. Our nature, to him, was a robe of suffering, assumed expressly, that when the crisis of our redemption came, justice might find him sacrificially attired and prepared for the altar, a substance which her sword could smite, a victim which could agonize and die. (p. 105) Christ had cast up the immeasurable sum of guilt to be canceled because of sin, and he gathered to his dying soul this vast responsibility, taking the sins of the whole world upon himself. Human nature was to him a robe of suffering; and when the crisis came, when he yielded himself a victim to Satan's rage, when he hung agonizing upon the cross, dying...
(The Signs of the Times , August 17, 1891)
...the father loves us, not in consequence of the great propitiation, but that he provided the propitiation because he loved us; because he was bent on obtaining a medium through which he could pour out the ocean-fulness of his love upon us. (pp. 105-106) The Father loves us, not because of the great propitiation, but He provided the propitiation because He loves us. Christ was the medium through which He could pour out His infinite love upon a fallen world.
(Steps to Christ, page 13)
'Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again because I lay down my life for the sheep;' in other words, 'My Father loves you with a love so unbounded, that he even loves me the more for dying to redeem you. ... by sustaining your liabilities, by surrendering my life as an equivalent for your transgressions...the Father loves me... (p. 106) Jesus said, "Therefore doth My Father love Me, because I lay down My life, that I might take it again." John 10:17. That is, "My Father has so loved you that He even loves Me more for giving My life to redeem you. In becoming your Substitute and Surety, by surrendering My life, by taking your liabilities, your transgressions, I am endeared to My Father..."
(Steps to Christ, page 14)
...by sustaining your liabilities...opening an ample channel for the tide of his love to flow in... (p. 106) By taking your sins upon myself, I am opening a channel through which his grace can flow to all who will accept it.
(The Review and Herald, December 23, 1890)
Having committed himself to the amazing work of our redemption, he resolved that he would spare nothing however costly, withhold nothing however dear, which was essential to the consumation of the design. (p. 109) But our God, having committed Himself to the amazing work of our redemption, in giving His only begotten Son resolved that He would spare nothing, however costly, that was essential in saving the soul of the sinner.
(The Bible Echo, June 17, 1895)
But man is severed from the life of God; his soul is so palsied... (p. 110) By sin we have been severed from the life of God. Our souls are palsied.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 203)
But man is severed from the life of God; his soul is so palsied and disabled by the deadly poison of sin. ... (p. 110) Man has severed his connection with God, and his soul has become palsied and strengthless by the deadly poison of sin.
(The Upward Look (1982), page 49)
Human selfishness would make a monopoly of eternal life. The Jewish christians would fain have made it a local and national benefit; till the unconfinable spirit came and showed them that, like the air, it belonged to the world. (p. 111) Selfishness would make a monopoly of eternal life. The Jewish nation thought to confine the benefits of salvation to their own nation; but the world's Redeemer showed them that salvation is like the air we breathe, like the atmosphere that belongs to the whole world.
(The Review and Herald, November 12, 1895)
He came to demolish every wall of partition, to throw open every compartment in the temple of creation, that every worshipper might have free and equal access to the God of the temple. (p. 112) Christ came to demolish every wall of partition, to throw open every compartment of the temple, that every soul may have free access to God.
(Christ's Object Lessons (1900), page 386)
The message of mercy which he brought from the Father was meant for the ear of the world; 'whoso hath ears to hear, let him hear.' And supposing the world to be assembled, and audience obtained, this was the music that broke from his lips: 'God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.' He gave him, to encircle the world with an atmosphere of grace, as real and universal, as the elemental air which encompasses and encircles around the globe itself; and whoever choose to inhale it, hath eternal life. (p. 112) The message of mercy that Christ brought from the Father to man was meant for the ears of the world: "I, if I be lifted up from the earth will draw all men unto me." Everlasting life has been purchased for man at an infinite cost. "God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." Through this matchless gift, Christ encircles the world with an atmosphere of grace. All who choose to inhale this life-giving air will have eternal life.
(The Youth's Instructor, November 9, 1899)
He gave him, to encircle the world with an atmosphere of grace, as real and universal, as the elemental air which encompasses and circulates around the globe itself; and whoever chooses to inhale it... (p. 112) In the matchless gift of His Son, God has encircled the whole world with an atmosphere of grace as real as the air which circulates around the globe. All who choose to breathe this...
(Steps to Christ, p. 68)
...that he should have adopted our nature into the person of his son, and should have carried it into the highest throne of the highest heaven. (p. 113) God has adopted human nature in the person of His Son, and has carried the same into the highest heaven.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 25)
...that he should have adopted our nature into the person of his Son, and have carried it to the highest throne of the highest heavens; that he should I confer on us an honor, to which a retinue of angels would form no comparison...whatever the point from which we contemplate his love, the prospect widens into infinitude; the subject grows in our hands ; amasses glory on glory, till it becomes too bright for contemplation, and towers as high as the heaven is above the earth. O what a God, what a Father, what an ocean of love is the God of our salvation ! Having collected all the riches of the universe, and laid open all the resources of his infinite nature, he gave them all into the hands of Christ, and said, ' These, all these, are for man ; use them for man ; distribute them to men ; if necessary, confer them all upon man, in order to convince him that there is no love in the universe but mine, and that his happiness consists in loving me, and giving himself to me in return.' (p. 113) That Christ should take human nature, and by a life of humiliation elevate man in the scale of moral worth with God; that he should carry his adopted nature to the throne of God, and there present his children to the Father, to have conferred upon them an honor exceeding that bestowed upon the angels,--this is love that melts the sinner's heart. It is too much for the human mind to grasp, that God, having gathered together all the riches of the universe, and laid open all the resources of his power, should place them in the hand of his Son, saying, All these I give to you for man. These are my gifts to him. Confer them upon him, that he may know that there is no love like mine, and that his eternal happiness consists in giving me his love in return. As the sinner contemplates this love, it broadens and deepens into infinitude, passing beyond his comprehension.
(The Youth's Instructor, November 9, 1899, paragraph 2)
Having collected all the riches of the universe, and laid open all the resources of his infinite nature, he gave them all into the hands of Christ and said, 'These, all these, are for man; use them for man; distribute them to men; if necessary, confer them all upon man, in order to convince him that there is no love in the universe but mine, and that his happiness consists in loving me, and giving himself to me in return.' (p. 113) Having collected the riches of the universe, and laid open the resources of infinite power, He gives them all into the hands of Christ, and says, All these are for man. Use these gifts to convince him that there is no love greater than Mine in earth or heaven. His greatest happiness will be found in loving Me.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 57)
'God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.' He gave him, to encircle the world with an atmosphere of grace, as real and universal, as the elemental air which encompasses and circulates around the globe...what an ocean of love... (p. 113) "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." ... What an ocean of love is circulating, like a divine atmosphere, around the world!
(The Youth's Instructor, July 29, 1897)
In the person of Christ, we behold the eternal God engaged in an enterprise of boundless mercy.
(p. 117)
In the person of Christ we behold the eternal God engaged in an enterprise of boundless mercy toward fallen man.
(The Signs of the Times, August 20, 1894, paragraph 8)
The human heart, in his hands, might have become a sacred harp, every chord of which should have sent forth none but heavenly music. (p. 118) The human heart, given up to Him, will become a sacred harp, sending forth sacred music.
(Selected Messages Book 2 (1958), (letter 365, 1904) p. 253)
Having restored our confidence in the divine character, the Savior sought to complete our love to God, by teaching us to address him by a new name; a name which should be at once a sign of our affection to him, and a pledge of his tender regard and relationship to us. He knew that the name which is entwined with the dearest associations of the human heart, is also the name which hath most music in the ear of God--and therefore he selected and encouraged us to employ it--the endearing appleation of Father. And that we might not be deterred from taking it into our lips by the fear of presumption, he continues to repeat it, again and again, until it becomes familiar to our ear. (p. 118) In order to strengthen our confidence in God, Christ teaches us to address Him by a new name, a name entwined with the dearest associations of the human heart. He gives us the privilege of calling the infinite God our Father. This name, spoken to Him and of Him, is a sign of our love and trust toward Him, and a pledge of His regard and relationship to us. Spoken when asking His favor or blessing, it is as music in His ears. That we might not think it presumption to call Him by this name, He has repeated it again and again. He desires us to become familiar with the appellation.
(Christ's Object Lessons (1900), pp. 141-142)
...teaching us to address him by a new name ; a name which should be at once a sign of our affection to him, and a pledge of his tender regard and relationship to us. ...the endearing appellation of Father. (p. 118) We may address Him by the endearing name, "Our Father," which is a sign of our affection for Him and a pledge of His tender regard and relationship to us.
(Testimonies for the Church Volume Five (1882-1889), pp. 739-740)
...he was the tabernacle of witness ; having been made flesh, he came and set up his tabernacle in the midst of the human encampment, pitched his tent side by side with our tents, to attest the presence of God, to make us familiar with his character and sensible of his love. (p. 137) This work Christ did to show men that He was the tabernacle of witness, that the Word had been made flesh. In the human encampment, amongst the erring and sinful, Christ pitched His tent. He lived close to the poor and the lowly, yet He was the King of glory. He would make all familiar with His character, that we might be partakers of the divine nature, and thus become one with Him in faith and practice.
(Manuscript Releases Volume Fifteen, page 261)
...they came to inquire, 'Art thou he that should come ; or do we look for another?' ....He spoke, and the deaf heard his voice; he spoke again, and the blind opened their eyes on the blessed light of day; he put forth his hand, and the crimson fever faded at 'his touch ; he looked on the dying, and they rose and were strong ; he called to the phrenzied demoniac, and madness itself fell down and worshipped him. (p. 141) The disciples came to Jesus with their message, "Art Thou He that should come, or do we look for another?" ... The voice of the mighty Healer penetrated the deaf ear. A word, a touch of His hand, opened the blind eyes to behold the light of day, the scenes of nature, the faces of friends, and the face of the Deliverer. Jesus rebuked disease and banished fever. His voice reached the ears of the dying, and they arose in health and vigor. Paralyzed demoniacs obeyed His word, their madness left them, and they worshiped Him.
(Desire of Ages, pp. 216-217)
...his love to sinners is yet stronger than death. (p. 145) The heart of God yearns over His earthly children with a love stronger than death.
(Steps to Christ, p. 21)
' He breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost.' By this emblematic act, he signified, not merely the impartation of miraculous powers, but the inspiration of his sanctifying spirit, the vital transfusion of his own self, into the souls of his people. He would have them to know, that henceforth, he and they can no more live a divided life; that he will live through their faculties, and act through their organs; and that they must choose with his will, and act with his spirit ; that it may be no more they that live, but he that liveth in them. But, in all this, he would impress them with the fact — that he is only giving to them the glory which the Father had given him, that both he and they might be one in God. (p. 150) He will live through them, giving them the inspiration of his sanctifying Spirit, imparting to the soul a vital transfusion of himself. He acts through their faculties, and causes them to choose his will and to act out his character. With the apostle Paul they then may say. "I am crucified with Christ; nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me." Christ impresses upon the mind of believers the fact that they are to have the glory which the Father has given him, in order that all who love and serve him may be one with God.
(Sabbath-School Worker, February 1, 1896)
...he pledges himself to the office of their PERSONAL INTERCESSOR ; 'I will pray the Father for you.' He who could not see them exposed to destruction without pouring out his life to save them, could not behold them prostrate at the throne of grace, as trembling suppliants, without raising them up and becoming their advocate. (p. 157) He pledges himself to fill the office of personal Intercessor, saying, "I will pray the Father." He who could not see human beings exposed to eternal ruin without pouring out his soul unto death in their behalf, will look with pity and compassion upon every one who realizes that he can not save himself. He will look upon no trembling suppliant without raising him up.
(The Review and Herald, October 30, 1900, paragraph 12)
By proclaiming himself our Intercessor, he would have us to know that the entire merit of all he did is contained as incense in his golden censer, that he might offer it up with the prayers of his people. Our prayers then, in their ascent to the throne of God, mingle and blend with the ascending incense of his merit. Our voice before it reaches the ear of God, falls in and blends with, the voice of him, whom the Father heareth always. (p. 157) Christ proclaims Himself our Intercessor. He would have us know that He has graciously engaged to be our Substitute. He places His merit in the golden censer to offer up with the prayers of His saints, so that the prayers of His dear children may be mingled with the fragrant merits of Christ's perfections as they ascend to the Father in the cloud of incense. The Father hears every prayer of His contrite children. The voice of supplication from the earth unites with the voice of our Intercessor who pleads in heaven, whose voice the Father always hears.
(Manuscript Releases Volume 19, page 215)
It is the name which he has solemnly pledged himself to honor...at the throne of grace... (p. 158) He has pledged himself to honor his Son's name as we present it at the throne of grace.
(The Youth's Instructor , January 30, 1896, paragraph 2)
The Father demonstrates his infinite love to Christ, by receiving and welcoming the friends of Christ as his own friends. He has pledged himself to do so; and he is so complacently delighted with Christ; so, fully satisfied with the atonement he has made; feels himself so unspeakably glorified by the incarnation and life, the death and mediation of Christ... (p. 159) And the Father demonstrates His infinite love for Christ, who paid our ransom by His blood, by receiving and welcoming Christ's friends as His friends. He is satisfied with the atonement made. He is glorified by the incarnation, the life, death and mediation of His Son.
(Australasian Union Conference Record, July 12, 1899, paragraph 13)
...the Savior proposes to shed abroad the love of God through every member of His body the church, to convey the circulating vitality of that love through every part of our nature, that it may dwell in us as it does in him. (p. 168) The love of God through Jesus Christ is shed abroad in the heart of every member of His body, carrying with it the vitality of the law of God the Father. Thus God may dwell with man, and man may dwell with God.
(Selected Messages Book 1 (1958), pp. 299-300)
That God should be manifested in the flesh, was truly the mystery which had been hid from ages, and from generations. (p. 169) God manifested in the flesh is the mystery that has been hidden "from ages and from generations."
(The Signs of the Times, May 18, 1891)
His voice gave the key-note to the universe. ... His unconfined power; His unsearchable understanding... (p. 172) His voice was the keynote of the universe. His unconfined power, His unsearchable understanding...
(In Heavenly Places (1967), page 248)
At the point where he vanished from the view of mortals, he was joined by the rejoicing ranks of the cherubim and seraphim ; he found them arranged to receive him ; impatient to commence the celebration of his deeds, and to conduct him in triumph to his glorious throne. ... ' Sing unto God, ye kingdoms of the earth: O sing praises unto the Lord ; to him that rideth upon the-heaven of heavens.' (p. 178) And while they stood gazing upward to catch the last glimpse of their ascending Lord, He was received into the rejoicing throng of cherubim and seraphim. As these heavenly beings escorted their Lord to His home, they sang in triumph, "Sing unto God, ye kingdoms of the earth; O sing praises unto the Lord; . . . to Him that rideth upon the heavens of heavens."
(The Signs of the Times, January 4, 1899)
And in doing this, observe, no external force is employed...the subject of the operation is never more conscious of mental liberty than when the change is in process. It is...the highest form of freedom. ... Even the expulsion of sin is the act of the soul itself... (p. 185) In the work of redemption there is no compulsion. No external force is employed. Under the influence of the Spirit of God, man is left free to choose whom he will serve. In the change that takes place when the soul surrenders to Christ, there is the highest sense of freedom. The expulsion of sin is the act of the soul itself.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 466)
The absolute necessity of regeneration by the Holy Spirit comes to us under the great seal of our Lord's most solemn asseveration...I say unto you ; I, who not merely desire to speak the truth, but who am the truth; I, who am the amen, the faithful and true witness...I, who hold the keys of that kingdom, I say unto you, Except a man be born of water and of the spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of heaven.' (p. 188) ...the absolute necessity of regeneration by the Holy Spirit, who comes to the believing soul under the great seal of solemn assurance. I speak to you, he said; I, who speak not merely as a man,--I, who am the Truth,--I, who am acquainted with heaven, and all the characters that shall be there admitted,--I, who hold the keys of the kingdom of heaven,--I say, "Except a man be born again, he can not see the kingdom of God."
(The Review and Herald, July 19, 1898, paragraph 20)
'He shall glorify me;' ... He engages to renovate the soul through the medium of truth... Does he not thus teach us, by his own example, to count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus our Lord? Does he not say to us, in actions louder than words, 'This is the sum of all science: ... this is life eternal, to know the true God, and Jesus Christ whom he hath sent;' (p. 195) He had said, "He shall glorify me." Through the agency of the Holy Spirit, the soul is sanctified by obedience to the truth, and Jesus says, "I am the way, the truth, and the life." He unfolded to man the important lesson that the sum of all science is to be found in the excellency of the knowledge of Christ. This knowledge can be incorporated into everyone's experience. The Scriptures declare, "This is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent."
(The Signs of the Times, June 9, 1890)
...without employing any force. ... He asks for no other weapons than these weapons of love...expelling it [sin] from all its recesses: I will change his pride into humility ; his enmity and unbelief into faith and love. (p. 196) God does not employ compulsory measures; love is the agent which He uses to expel sin from the heart. By it He changes pride into humility, and enmity and unbelief into love and faith.
(Thoughts from the Mount of Blessing (1896), pp. 76-77)
He takes of the things of Christ and shows them to the soul, expressly that it may catch their temper and likeness. He holds before its eye the mirror of the gospel, that beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, it may be changed into the same image. (pp. 196-197) He takes of the things of Christ and shows them unto him. If the eye is kept fixed on Christ, the work of the Spirit ceases not until the soul is conformed to His image.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 302)
...the Saviour would have his disciples to lift up their thoughts, to enlarge their expectations, and form the loftiest conceptions of excellence and grace; declaring, that the advent of the Spirit would more than compensate for the loss of his own personal presence. (p. 201) As disciples they are to learn continually of Christ, how to lift up their thoughts, to enlarge their expectations, and to have the loftiest conceptions of His excellence and grace, that the endowment of His Holy Spirit may compensate for the loss of His personal presence.
(The Upward Look (1982), page 266)
For, in proportion as the value and necessity of an object rise in our view, our demand for encouragement to pursue it rises also. (p. 205) With earnest desire they yield all and manifest an interest proportionate to the value of the object which they seek.
(Steps to Christ, p. 45)
...though the Great Teacher held in his hand the entire map of truth, he disclosed only so much of the part in question as related to our path to heaven. (p. 212) The Great Teacher held in his hand the entire map of truth, but he did not disclose it all to his disciples. He opened to them those subjects only which were essential for their advancement in the path to heaven.
(The Review and Herald, April 23, 1908)
Our Lord instituted but two ordinances-—baptism and the Lord's supper : he erected but two monumental pillars: one without, and the other within the church: on the first of these, that which fronts the world, he inscribed the great name of the triune God; and, as if to render the inscription more impressive, he made it his last act. Baptism is the vestibule, or entrance, to his spiritual temple, the church; so that before his disciples can pass the threshold, he requires them to receive the print of the Sacred Name: and by making that one ceremony final, he reminds them that the holy signature is indelible. By baptizing us into the threefold name of God... (p. 213) The ordinances of baptism and the Lord's Supper are two monumental pillars, one without and one within the church. Upon these ordinances Christ has inscribed the name of the true God. Christ has made baptism the sign of entrance to His spiritual kingdom. He has made this a positive condition with which all must comply who wish to be acknowledged as under the authority of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Before man can find a home in the church, before passing the threshold of God's spiritual kingdom, he is to receive the impress of the divine name, "The Lord our Righteousness." Jeremiah 23:6. Baptism is a most solemn renunciation of the world. Those who are baptized in the threefold name...
(Testimonies for the Church Vol. 6 (1901), p. 91)
He designed the church to be his own peculium; it is the only fortress which he holds in a revolted world: and he intended therefore, that no authority should be known in it, no laws acknowledged, but his own... (p. 222) ...the Lord has a people, a chosen people, his church, to be his own, his own fortress, which he holds in a sin-stricken, revolted world; and he intended that no authority should be known in it, no laws be acknowledged by it, but his own.
(General Conference Daily Bulletin, February 27, 1893)
He designed the church to be his own peculium ; it is the only fortress which he holds in a revolted world... a betrayal of the most sacred trust, and treachery to the great cause of Christ. (p. 222) The church is God's fortress, his city of refuge, which he holds in a revolted world. Any betrayal of her sacred trust is treachery to Him who has bought her with the precious blood of his only begotten Son.
(The Ellen G. White 1888 Materials (1987), page 1554)
But the church of Christ, enfeebled and defective as it may be, is that only object on earth, on which he bestows his supreme regard. (p. 225) The church, enfeebled and defective, needing to be reproved, warned, and counseled, is the only object upon earth upon which Christ bestows his supreme regard.
(The Review and Herald, September 5, 1893, paragraph 6)
It [the church] is the theatre of his grace ; in which he is making experiments of mercy on human hearts... (p. 225) The church is the theatre of his grace, in which he delights in making experiments of his mercy on human hearts.
(1888 Materials, page 1554; letter To S. N. Haskell)
But the great object which had brought Christ upon earth was to dispute that [Satan's] sovereignty... (p. 230) Christ came to our world to dispute Satan's sovereignty...
(Manuscript Releases Volume 17 (1990), page 32)
He beheld in it a scene of woe, which never failed to call forth his profound compassion. On all sides he beheld the blinded victims of satanic cruelty; vast, crowded tracts of spiritual beings, immortal essences, wasted, ruined, murdered, lost; a captive world, chained to the wheels of a spoiler, and moving along, to endless death. ... he beheld them consummating their cruelty by actually incorporating with men; turning their bodies into living tombs, engrossing and demonizing all their powers, merging the man in the fiend. Yes, man, who had been created in the image of God,' became the habitation of dragons;' his heart the fuel consumed by their passions; his senses and organs, the slaves of their rampant impiety; hell brought to him, and begun in him, upon earth ; an incarnate demon, his features putting on the image of the legion within him;—what a sight for the Lover of souls! what a spectacle for infinite goodness to contemplate! (pp. 230-31) The Son of God, looking upon the world, beheld suffering and misery. With pity He saw how men had become victims of satanic cruelty. He looked with compassion upon those who were being corrupted, murdered, and lost. They had chosen a ruler who chained them to his car as captives. Bewildered and deceived, they were moving on in gloomy procession toward eternal ruin,--to death in which is no hope of life, toward night to which comes no morning. Satanic agencies were incorporated with men. The bodies of human beings, made for the dwelling place of God, had become the habitation of demons. The senses, the nerves, the passions, the organs of men, were worked by supernatural agencies in the indulgence of the vilest lust. The very stamp of demons was impressed upon the countenances of men. Human faces reflected the expression of the legions of evil with which they were possessed. Such was the prospect upon which the world's Redeemer looked. What a spectacle for Infinite Purity to behold!
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 36)
Satan appears, to have called in his agents from every other pursuit, and to have set them in array against him alone; turning away from all ignobler prey, he seems to have made him the sole mark for every shaft and weapon of hell. As if the temptation of Christ were too great an, enterprise, a field too momentous, to be left to the power of a common arm, the prince of darkness himself, undertook personally to conduct the untried adventure. (p. 232) The issues of the conflict involved too much to be entrusted to his confederate angels. He must personally conduct the warfare. All the energies of apostasy were rallied against the Son of God. Christ was made the mark of every weapon of hell.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 116)
...we can only arrive at one conclusion, that his whole life was a continued conflict, hourly increasing in fierceness and malignity on the part of hell... (p. 233) Therefore, the life of Christ was a perpetual warfare against Satanic agencies. Satan rallied the whole energies of apostasy against the Son of God. The conflict increased in fierceness and malignity...
(The Review and Herald, October 29, 1895)
...every member belonging to it is a vassal rescued from the empire of sin... (p. 235) Christ came to this world, and rescued his disciples from the empire of sin...
(The Review and Herald, April 6, 1897)
When the seventy returned to him, saying ' Even the devils are subject to us through thy name,' he received the announcement as matter of course ; his eye had followed them wherever they had gone ; and, surveying futurity as already present, had beheld in their success the earnest of a triumph in which 'Satan should fall like lightning from heaven;' looking through all the intermediate clouds and storms of time, he gazed ... then he saw in perspective, the completion of his triumph and beyond : his prophetic ear, even then, caught the distant shout of his redeemed church. He knew, that when he should exclaim, 'It is finished,' ... (p. 236) Like the apostles, the seventy had received supernatural endowments as a seal of their mission. When their work was completed, they returned with joy, saying, "Lord, even the devils are subject unto us through Thy name." Jesus answered, "I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven." The scenes of the past and the future were presented to the mind of Jesus. He beheld Lucifer as he was first cast out from the heavenly places. He looked forward to the scenes of His own agony, when before all the worlds the character of the deceiver should be unveiled. He heard the cry, "It is finished"
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 490)
...the shadow of death settled down upon all, and enwrapping it [the world] like a funeral pall... (p. 255) Satan has cast his hellish shadow of corruption and iniquity, and has covered the earth with darkness as with a funeral pall...
(The Signs of the Times, August 15, 1895)
'The Son of man shall come in his glory; and before him shall be gathered all nations.' We have already had occasion to remark that the resurrection of the dead will not take place as a final event; that it stands in the relation of means to an end, and that end, the general judgment, with its eternal awards. Even Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied of that day, saying, 'Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousand of his saints, to execute judgment upon all.' And Solomon, when, in the capacity of a preacher...took it from the prospect of a judgment to come ; ' Let us hear the conclusion of the whole mailer: Fear God, and keep his commandments: for this is the whole duty of man. For God shall bring every work into judgment, with every secret thing, whether it be good or whether it be evil.' (p. 271). "The Son of man shall come in His glory; . . . and before Him shall be gathered all nations." This subject should be kept before the people as a means to an end,--that end the judgment, with its eternal punishments and rewards. Then God will render to every man according to his work. Enoch prophesied of these things, saying, "Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousands of His saints, to execute judgment upon all." And Solomon, the preacher of righteousness, when making his declaration and appeal, presented the judgment to come. "Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter," he said; "Fear God, and keep His commandments: for this is the whole duty of man. For God shall bring every work into judgment, with every secret thing, whether it be good, or whether it be evil."
(The Review and Herald, June 18, 1901)
When speaking of the final judgment, it is observable that he seldom omitted to insist and enlarge on its publicity. ...having it held in the presence of all worlds; that piety may be most honored, sin most abashed, and the government of God vindicated and glorified, on the largest possible scale. ... It will not be the judgment of a single individual, nor of a nation, but of a whole world of intelligent and accountable beings. (p. 273) In his teachings, Christ sought to impress men with the certainty of the coming judgment, and with its publicity. This is not the judgment of a few individuals, or even of a nation, but of a whole world of human intelligences, of accountable beings. It is to be held in the presence of other worlds, that the love, the integrity, the service, of man for God, may be honored to the highest degree.
(The Review and Herald, November 22, 1898)
When speaking of the final judgment...having it held in the presence of all worlds ; that...the government of God vindicated and glorified, on the largest possible scale. In a few descriptive words, he fills the horizon with intelligent beings of all orders and characters. It will not be the judgment of a single individual, nor of a nation, but of a whole world of intelligent and accountable beings. (p. 273) When speaking to congregations, there is always before me the final judgment, which is to be held in the presence of the world, when the law of God's government is to be vindicated, His name glorified, His wisdom acknowledged and testified of as just to believers and unbelievers. This is not the judgment of one person, nor of a nation, but of a whole world of intelligent beings, of all orders, of all characters.
(Manuscript Releases Volume 8 (1990), page 244)
...the Judge, the Prince of sufferers...he who submitted to be arraigned, and who occupied the cross here, should then ascend the throne as his proper reward. (p. 274) God designed that the Prince of sufferers in humanity should be judge of the whole world. ...he who submitted to be arraigned before an earthly tribunal, and who suffered the ignominious death of the cross,--he alone is to pronounce the sentence of reward or of punishment. ...and ascend the throne...
(The Review and Herald, November 22, 1898)
There are others who construe his apparent delay in favor of the impunity of prosperous vice. 'The evil servant saith in his heart, My Lord delayeth his coming. ... ' As in the days of Noah, they laugh at the threatened judgment, and 'eat and drink, marry, and are given in marriage.' Because the event has been long foretold, but through a series of ages has not taken place, they conclude it need be dreaded no more... (p. 287) There are those who say, not only in their hearts, but in all their works, "My Lord delayeth his coming." They show the effect of error upon them by smiting their fellow-servants and eating and drinking with the drunken. As in the days of Noah, those who have had great light will show their inconsistency. Because Christ's coming has been long foretold, they conclude that there is a mistake in regard to this doctrine.
(Manuscript Releases Volume 7 (1990), page 182)
...the moral law... It is, in effect, the voice of God speaking to the soul... (p. 299) ...the law of God... Give heed to it as the voice of God speaking to your soul.
(Steps to Christ, page 35)
And the quality of the provision which he has made for his worship... He has placed it under the entire superintendence of the Holy Spirit... (p. 306) Everything pertaining to his worship is placed under the superintendence of his Holy Spirit.
(The Review and Herald, February 25, 1896, paragraph 8)
And the spirituality of devotion which Jesus taught is opposed to that which is formal and insincere. In religion the heart is every thing; if the heart be absent from the worship of God, the man is absent; or, what is worse, the Omniscient beholds, in the stead of a sincere worshipper, a piece of solemn formality going through the attitudes and signs of devotion, and even uttering the affecting language of confession, supplication, and praise, but entirely devoid of any corresponding emotions within. He beholds moreover, in the rights of such worship, an array of spiritual idols: of means converted into ends; of forms erected into objects of trust, supplanting him and substituted in his stead, robbing him of the homage which is due unto his name. (p. 310) Many churches erected, and worship going on in them formal and insincere. The heart is going after its idols. In the place of heart devotion, the Lord beholds apparent solemnity and formality The attitudes and signs of devotion are performed. He hears men confessing. their sins, but not repenting or forsaking them. He discerns an array of spiritual idols which engage the attention and in which men trust, supplanting God. He sees a system of maxims, customs, and false theories, which they tenaciously cherish, robbing Him of the honor due His name.
(Manuscript Releases Volume 12 (1990), page 221)
...our worship, to be acceptable, must correspond with his nature. Accordingly, when we come before him, he requires that the soul, the noblest part of our nature, should do him homage: that our thoughts should relate to him, our affections embrace him... (pp. 310-311) In order for worship to be acceptable, it must be offered in faith and hope, and the life must be in harmony with it. God requires the devotion of heart, mind, soul, and strength. Our noblest powers are to be used to do Him homage. Our thoughts are to be conformed to His will; our affections sanctified to His service.
(Manuscript Releases - Volume 9 (1990), page 386)
'Out of the heart,' said he, 'proceed evil thoughts...' It is there that error takes its rise as from a fountain, and thence all the streams of error are constantly fed. (p. 311) "Out of the heart proceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness, blasphemies." The fountain of the heart must be purified before the streams can become pure.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 172)
Created under a law which promised us life on the condition of our perfect obedience... (p. 325) The condition of eternal life is now just what it always has been...perfect obedience to the law of God, perfect righteousness.
(Steps to Christ, page 62)
But the Jews, while they scrupulously honored the signs, entirely lost sight of the thing signified. (p. 326) The very priests who ministered in the temple had lost sight of the significance of the service they performed. They had ceased to look beyond the symbol to the thing signified.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 36)
...to be pardoned, in the scriptural sense, is at the same time to be renewed in the spirit of their mind... (p. 328) To be pardoned in the way that Christ pardons, is not only to be forgiven, but to be renewed in the spirit of our mind.
(The Review and Herald, August 19, 1890)
In effacing from your minds the image of the earthly, his design is to impress on them the image of the heavenly; that you may show forth his likeness and circulate his praise in the world. (p. 334) Jesus desires to efface the image of the earthly from the minds of his followers, and to impress upon them the image of the heavenly, that they may become one with himself, reflecting his character, and showing forth the praises of him who hath called them out of darkness into his marvelous light.
(The Review and Herald, August 19, 1890, paragraph 4)
O for the aid of the Holy Spirit, the Spirit of Christ, to unveil his excellencies to our view; that, while we are beholding, we may be changed into the same image; may have our taste purified and exalted into sympathy with his transcendant character! (p. 336) Through the influence of the Spirit of God, the believer is transformed in character; his taste is refined...by beholding Christ, he is changed into the same image.
(The Youth's Instructor, December 6, 1894)
The prince of this world came, and found nothing in him; no single thought or feeling which responded to temptation, or disposed him for a moment to yield to it. (p. 339) "The prince of this world cometh," said Jesus, "and hath nothing in Me." John 14:30. There was in Him nothing that responded to Satan's sophistry. He did not consent to sin. Not even by a thought did He yield to temptation.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 123)
...suffered in proportion to the perfection of his holiness, and the depth of his aversion to sin; but though his residence in an atmosphere of sin was revolting to his purity... (p. 340) And He suffered in proportion to the perfection of His holiness and His hatred of sin. ... To be surrounded by human beings under the control of Satan was revolting to Him.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 700)
Where he had passed, the restored might be seen, making trial of their new-found powers; listeners, formed into groups to hear the tale of healing; and the delighted objects of his compassion... His voice was the first sound which many of them heard ; his name the first word they had pronounced; his blessed form the first sight they had ever beheld. ... He went through the land like a current of vital air, an element of life, diffusing health and joy wherever he appeared. (p. 343) Where He had passed, the objects of His compassion were rejoicing in health, and making trial of their new-found powers. Crowds were collecting around them to hear from their lips the works that the Lord had wrought. His voice was the first sound that many had ever heard, His name the first word they had ever spoken, His face the first they had ever looked upon. Why should they not love Jesus, and sound His praise? As He passed through the towns and cities He was like a vital current, diffusing life and joy wherever He went.
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 350)
...a fountain of healing mercy for the recovery of the world... (p. 389) Jesus was the fountain of healing mercy for the world...
(The Desire of Ages (1898), page 74)
He came, not to astonish, but to instruct and to save; and to instruct solely with a view to save; and knowing that to feed curiosity is only to increase its appetite, that to impart a particle of knowledge more than is essential to our advance in the path of holiness... (p. 395) Jesus did not come to astonish men with some great announcement of some special time when some great event would occur, but he came to instruct and save the lost. He did not come to arouse and gratify curiosity; for he knew that this would but increase the appetite for the curious and the marvelous. It was his aim to impart knowledge whereby men might increase in spiritual strength, and advance in the way of obedience and true holiness.
(The Review and Herald, March 22, 1892)

“Therefore,” declares the Lord, “I am against the prophets who steal from one another words supposedly from me.” (Jer. 23:30 NIV)

"My views were written independent of books or of the opinions of others." (Manuscript 7, 1867)

"I am dependent upon the Spirit of the Lord in writing my views as I am in receiving them, yet the words I employ in describing what I have seen are my own, unless they be those spoken to me by an angel, which I always enclose in marks of quotation." (Review and Herald, Oct. 8, 1867)

"I have not been in the habit of reading any doctrinal articles in the paper, that my mind should not have any understanding of anyone's ideas and views, and that not a mold of any man's theories should have any connection with that which I write." . (Letter 37, 1887, p. 1. To E. J. Waggoner and A. T. Jones, Feb. 18, 1887; 3SM p. 63.)

"If Mrs. White has gathered the facts from a human mind in a single case she has in thousands of cases, and God has not shown her these things which she has written in these personal testimonies." (James White, Life Sketches (1880), p. 328)

"These books contain clear, straight, unalterable truth and they should certainly be appreciated. The instruction they contain is not of human production." (Letter H-339, Dec. 26, 1904)

"I do not write one article in the paper expressing merely my own ideas. They are what God has opened before me in vision -the precious rays of light shining from the throne" (Testimonies, Vol. 5, pp. 63-67)

"Therefore," says the Lord, "I stand against these prophets who get their messages from each other." (Jer. 23:30 NLT)

NOTES

1. Google notes that this book was in Ellen White's personal library. Title page for John Harris' The Great Teacher, http://books.google.com/books?id=hXVLAAAAIAAJ, extracted Sep. 19, 2008.


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